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Battle of Waterloo Medals

Discussion in 'British Army' started by Findem, Jun 11, 2014.

  1. 348 White

    348 White New Member

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    Assuming that the Harris in question was the one acting as a bat man at Waterloo then the following link to the 33rd Foot re-enactment group shows good recreations of the men and families of the unit in 1812-16. Harris might well have been wearing the white forage jacket and the forage cap rather than the redcoat and shako which he would for parades and battle.
    Code:
    http://33rdfoot.co.uk/
     
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  2. Findem

    Findem The Fearless One

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    Thanks for the info 348 White, I do apologise for not replying sooner but have been somewhat under the weather due to being in hospital 4 time since January this year. During my last visit on the 26th of July it appears I picked up some sort of intestinal bug and I've gone through vomiting, constipation and the runs, on the bright side as my son remarked, at least my nose didn't run.

    The only info I have about my Harris family and their whereabouts at the time of the battle is that Samuel was an officer's servant and the family sat having breakfast sometime after the battle on a dead horse, I find that strange but there you go.

    Attached to the burial entry in the Coggeshall Museum site for Amelia was a statement that "This woman and her husband and three children were at the Battle of Waterloo 1815."

    When I'm feeling a bit better I'll come back to these posts and see if there's anything else I can add.
     
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  3. 348 White

    348 White New Member

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  4. 348 White

    348 White New Member

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    Get well soon.

    I'm pretty confident that Samuel Harris of No 8 Co, 33rd Foot is your man and that the child born in Germany was probably born in late 1813 somewhere on the stretch of Baltic coast. Checking with a well published author editor of books on Waterloo, I found he concurred with my opinion.

    Annoyingly, the journalist whose piece mentions Mrs Harris was writing a short piece well after the events. The use of 'first day' of the battle might actually be referring to the battle of Quatre Bras on the 16th of June rather than Waterloo itself on the 18th. The presence of a 33rd camp follower with the Brigade is hard to account for on the evening of the 16th or the morning of the 17th. Likewise the morning of the 18th at the Mount St Jean position.

    Perhaps, for some reason, the family did manage to reach the field of the Battle of Waterloo a short while after the fighting? An obituary of Mrs Barbara Moon in 1903, whose father served with the 3/95th, stated that she had ridden in a cart as a four year old child over the field on the evening of the 18th.
     
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  5. Findem

    Findem The Fearless One

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    Thanks for that info 348 White and thank you also for making enquiries with the author, shortly I intend to collate all the info you have provided and attached it to Samuel Harris. Samuel Harris has been an eye opener to me, there was a time when I though I was the only one in my direct line of ancestors who had seen quite a bit of the world and lived outside of the UK, even if it was only 18 months, however Samuel and family seem to have done quite a bit of Globetrotting, just goes to show one never knows what's going to turn up.
     
  6. 348 White

    348 White New Member

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    It would be intriguing to learn more about Samuel, although a batman in 1815 he could well have seen action in the previous year. The garrison stint in Stralsund in 1813 involved no combat, but the following year saw the 33rd in Holland at the first and second battles of Merxem and one of the unit's involved in the failed assault on Bergen-op-Zoom. I assume his family were amongst those sailing with the 33rd in July 1813 aboard the Earl Moira and the Robert Taylor. The half of the Regiment in the Robert Taylor numbered 345 men, 32 women and 11 children. The 33rd men and baggage on the Robert Taylor disembarked at Rugen and were transported on the last leg of the journeyto Stralsund on the Emperor Alexander. The return to England in November from Rostock was aboard the Amelia Wilson, Warrior and Leicester. The women and children seem to have been disembarked at Yarmouth, rather than proceeding to Holland with their men and must have joined up with them on the continent at a later date.
     
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