Arras Memorial- WW1.

Discussion in 'WWI (1914 - 1918)' started by Ma-dotcom, Feb 26, 2017.

  1. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Having just learned of a recently found 2nd cousin x one removed having died in March 1918 -France & Flanders- 253RD TUNN. COY., R.E.). Memorial Bay 1 Arras Memorial, I tried for details & view grave stone.
    It appears to be a memorial only- would that be correct? Remains buried but unnamed?

    Code:
    http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/82700/ARRAS%20MEMORIAL
    Historical Information

    "The French handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917.

    The Commonwealth section of the FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY was begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier. It continued to be used by field ambulances and fighting units until November 1918. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from two smaller cemeteries in the vicinity.


    The cemetery contains over 2,650 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 10 of which are unidentified.
    The graves in the French military cemetery were removed after the war to other burial grounds and the land they had occupied was used for the construction of the Arras Memorial and Arras Flying Services Memorial.

    The adjacent ARRAS MEMORIAL commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The most conspicuous events of this period were the Arras offensive of April-May 1917, and the German attack in the spring of 1918. Canadian and Australian servicemen killed in these operations are commemorated by memorials at Vimy and Villers-Bretonneux. A separate memorial remembers those killed in the Battle of Cambrai in 1917.
    "
     
  2. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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    We have no known graves of our two brothers who are remembered at Villers-Bretonneux so I would say it might be the case there as well
     
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  3. Sis

    Sis Rootles out resources!

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    I've heard of that before Wendy. I think it's usually when people can't be definitely identified or the haven't found a body.
     
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  4. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    I think so, Wendy.

    Quite often there wasn't anything left to bury. :(
     
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  5. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Reminds me of my Humphrey line one brother of G'mother was said to have been 'blown to bits' in the war. Never found trace in military records for sure,- one last seen in 1901 census was then a 'gas fitter lab'r' the other badly spelled as Hamphery at my G'parents home in Croydon.

    Would like to find out which one did what, where & when.
     

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