Burial/Cemetery Registers

Discussion in 'Dublin' started by LianeH, Sep 2, 2014.

  1. LianeH

    LianeH Well-Known Member

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    My 2 x great grandmother committed suicide in 1895 at Drogheda. Is there any way of finding records of where she might be buried.

    The problem is that she was there because my 2 x great grandfather was with the British Army and they were based at Barracks there. Would it be that she was buried in the barracks or a military cemetery?

    Also any ideas on how to find out any inquest details. I have in the past Emailed the Coroners office there who have no records of this event and said that as it was British Army then they would hold records but I'm not sure where to look for those or even if they would be available.

    Right over to the great brains of TD as any help gratefully received.
     
  2. Blackmogs

    Blackmogs Moderator. General Dogs(cats)body. Staff Member

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    Hi Liane, do you know his regiment?
     
  3. LianeH

    LianeH Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mogs

    John Little was in the Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry.

    Thanks for any help
     
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  4. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    You may find that the inquest was reported in the newspapers. Find My Past have some Irish newspapers, which you should be able to view via your local Library's subscription.

    What was your 2 x great grandmother's name?
     
  5. LianeH

    LianeH Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jan

    I did find a newspaper report on her but no real details on the inquest. Her name was Rachel Little, she was aged 25 and her husband was a sergeant. She drank oxylic acid - not a good way to go.
     
  6. Huncamunca

    Huncamunca The Knowledgeable One

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    On the Ordnance Survey Ireland website you can see detailed old maps which may be helpful in finding out which burial grounds were nearby. Start here:

    http://
    maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,591271,743300,0,10

    You can just zoom in until you find the place where you want. If (like me) you don't know Ireland well enough to do that, you can click on Search in top right-hand menu and then search by (modern) address. Millmount Square Drogheda gets you quite near. Then switch to the Historic 25" map (using lower right-hand menu) to see where the barracks were. These maps are from 1897-1913 so not too distant from the date your John & Rachel Little were there. (There are 6" maps too, but they are a lot earlier, 1829-1841.)

    Finding burial registers is not so straightforward. There is an online transcript of a burial register for St Peter's, Drogheda, but I couldn't see any Littles :(

    http://
    ireland.anglican.org/about/185

    Perhaps the Old Drogheda Society and/or the Drogheda Museum would be able to advise you on what other burial records survive? The former have published some books of monumental inscriptions I think, but many graves would have had no permanent marker.

    Re. the coroners' records you could try the National Archives of Ireland. There's a small section about such records in this article:

    www.
    nationalarchives.ie/topics/Medical_sources/Hospital_records.pdf

    Also (clutching at straws now!) you could try the relevant regimental museum in case they have any archives from that period.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014
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  7. LianeH

    LianeH Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Huncamunca I'll have a look at the maps tomorrow (got a day off so loads of time for me - yippee).

    The regimental museum is a good call, will try them as well. I have tried the National Archives and they gave me contact details of the coroners office but they don't hold records - maybe this one will have to be one of those destined never to be found.

    Thank you for your interest and help
     
  8. Londoner

    Londoner Will always roll up her sleeves and dig around

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    As a suicide she would not have been buried on consecrated ground. Some churches had an area just outside for such burials
     
  9. Huncamunca

    Huncamunca The Knowledgeable One

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    I have been trying to find out when and where that rule applied, but have been getting bogged down in legal detail!

    Burn's Justice of the Peace and Parish Officer (1831 edition) says (citing the 1823 Burial in Suicide Act) that 'now a felo de se may be buried in the church-yard though he is still denied Christian burial'. As I understand it that didn't necessarily mean in unconsecrated ground, but without Christian burial rites. According to James B. Little's The Law of Burial (3rd edn, 1902) this Act 'directed that such persons should be privately interred in the usual churchyard or burial place, but between the hours of nine and twelve at night, and without the rites of Christian burial.'

    The law changed again in 1882, with the Interments (Felo-de-Se) Act. Sylvia M. Barnard's To Prove I'm Not Forgot: Living and Dying in a Victorian City, partly online on Google Books, quotes part of a Victorian vade-mecum called Things you ought to know, clearly explained', which set out the situation after 1882:

    Suicide 'while of unsound mind' is not a disqualification for Christian burial, which can only be refused to those suicides who are presumed to have been of sound mind when the act was committed. Formerly when a verdict of 'felo-de-se' was recorded. . .

    (unfortunately the next page is not available on Google Books!).

    What I haven't been able to discover is whether this applied in Ireland, so all this may be irrelevant to Liane's query. I will try to find out, but not today . . . I need some lighter reading before bed.
     
  10. Chimp

    Chimp Moderator & Cheeky Human IMP Staff Member

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    Felo de se, Latin for "felon of himself", is an archaic legal term meaning suicide. In early English common law, an adult who committed suicide was literally a felon, and the crime was punishable by forfeiture of property to the king and what was considered a shameful burial.

    I wonder where I read that :D
     
  11. Londoner

    Londoner Will always roll up her sleeves and dig around

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    Thanks for enlarging and clarifying my rather general statement.
     
  12. patten-walsh

    patten-walsh Well-Known Member

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    Only just seen this .Irishnewsarchive has a report of the inquest which was heard on 30th Aug,the day after the event.It appeared in Freemans Journal on 30th Aug.
    Can send a pdf copy if needed
    PM me
     
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