Carpenter to Wheelwright??

Discussion in 'Other Occupations & Trades' started by Blackmogs, Jan 7, 2021.

  1. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    Post #18 @Chimp - I never knew that (lesson for the day), odd though, that for years the printers were able to produce the diphthong below (I cannot replicate on the keyboard)
    upload_2021-1-10_8-25-51.png
     
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  2. Chimp

    Chimp Moderator & Cheeky Human IMP Staff Member

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    æ is a hard one to reproduce, for characters like these I use 'word' and chose it from their insert symbol function, then copy it to here.
     
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  3. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    there was another symbol for the other 'th' sound looks like a curled over d, ð called eth


    thorn used in 'thin'
    eth used in 'that'

    the joined up ae is called ash
     
  4. Findem

    Findem The Fearless One

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    Jfyi, Cordwainers and Bootmakers do make the same products but a Cordwainer is someone who uses a special leather imported from Cordoba in Spain, for the gentry no doubt.
     
  5. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    Never heard that before, @Findem. :)
     
  6. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    From the Worshipful Company of Cordwainers web site
    Code:
    http://cordwainers.org/
    Cordwainers are shoemakers who practised their trade for centuries within the walls of the City of London.

    During the medieval period, craftsmen formed guilds to regulate their trades and to protect the quality of their wares. The guilds trained apprentices and supported their members through good times and bad.

    Granted charters by successive monarchs, Cordwainers were licensed to trade within a particular area, known then, as now, as the Ward of Cordwainer – in fact, we are the only livery company to share our name with a ward of the City.

    Like many livery companies, the Cordwainers had an official home, a grand hall that bordered St Paul’s Churchyard. One was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, and the last was damaged beyond repair in the Blitz in 1941. All that remains is a plaque to mark the spot.
     
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  7. Blackmogs

    Blackmogs Moderator. General Dogs(cats)body. Staff Member

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    Off piste? You lot? Never :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
    C|:-)C|:-)C|:-)C|:-)C|:-)
     
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  8. Findem

    Findem The Fearless One

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    Been trying to remember where I read that piece of info, probably Google, one of my ancestors a William Searles was a Cordwainer which is why I checked it out. He was a Cordwainer around the early 1700s, he was born about 1680, probably Great Saling, if not, one of the Bardfields, both those places have the early PRs missing.
     
  9. Schnurrbart

    Schnurrbart Well-Known Member

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    The gentry must have been a stingey lot as I have cordwainers/bootmakers/ shoemakers (seems the words were interchangeable) in the family, but none of them were wealthy and all lived in the East End of London.
    My 19th Century dictionary has cordwain as dressed and tanned goatskin.
     
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  10. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    I have a number of cordwainers, none of them from London - apart from one that had a lengthy holiday on a hulk in the Thames.
     
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  11. Schnurrbart

    Schnurrbart Well-Known Member

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    Apparently, Wordsmith was first used in1837 and presumably by someone who liked the sound, or didn't know the difference between the roots of smith and wright. Smith is allied to smite (to strike) and wright is allied to wrought (to work)
    Also, came across a reference in article on Jimmy Choo. The term "cordwainer" had been used since 12th-century Britain to denote artisans who made shoes from new leather, as opposed to cobblers who worked with used material.
     
  12. Findem

    Findem The Fearless One

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    Must admit the article I read, way back, didn't mention what animal the leather came from.
     

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