Electoral Registers and Burgess Rolls

Discussion in 'British Electoral Rolls' started by Daft Bat, May 15, 2013.

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  1. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    Electoral Registers and Burgess Rolls

    These are the lists of people who could vote in elections.

    Electoral registers list the people who could vote in parliamentary elections.

    Burgess rolls list the people who could only vote in county borough elections (local elections).

    Due to the way electoral registers and Burgess rolls may record the recent/former address they can be useful for finding previous addresses of individuals or even previous residents at an address.

    Who could vote?

    Not everyone was eligible to vote in the past, the franchise increased over the years.

    1832 elections
    Boroughs: The traditional franchise of each borough this changed according to the borough) with the addition of householders (whether owners or tenants) of property assessed as worth £10 a year.
    Counties outside Boroughs: Freeholders with property worth 40s a year. Copyholders renting property at £10 a year.£10 leaseholders with at least 60 year leases.£50 leaseholders with at least 20 year leases. Any tenant paying more than £50 a year.

    1867 elections
    Boroughs: Every adult male householder resident for a year and heads of families lodging in unfurnished rooms paying £10 a year in rent.
    Counties: Any owner or leaseholder of property rated at £5 a year, or tenant of a property rated at £12 a year.

    1869 elections
    Some women received a vote in local elections.

    1884 elections
    1884 introduced uniform qualifications for counties and boroughs.
    Every adult male householder resident for a year and heads of families lodging in unfurnished rooms paying £10 a year in rent.
    The old forty-shilling freehold rights were retained for inherited land or that acquired by marriage, as were the rights of freemen in boroughs.
    Those who occupied a dwelling house by virtue of any office, service or employment were also given the vote.
    However little over fifty per cent of men over the age of 21 appeared on the electoral register.
    Most rural labourers were able the vote. Still excluded were heads of householders who shared houses, adult males living with parent(s), soldiers in barracks and women.

    1918 elections
    All males over 21. Women over 30 who were householders or wives of householders (6 women in 10).

    1928 elections
    Every resident or owner over 21

    1969 elections
    Everybody over 18.

    (Written by Guy Etchells)
     
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