Letters From Soldiers Widows

Discussion in 'WWI (1914 - 1918)' started by Bonzo Dog, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Bonzo Dog

    Bonzo Dog Still the Mad Scientist?

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    Teeside University has put online a huge collection of letters (scanned images) written to a Mrs Mary Pennyman by women who had lost loved ones. Who knows, there may be one written by a relative.

    Code:
    http://www.dearmrspennyman.com 
     
  2. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Thank you Dave,- there must have been so-ooo many.
     
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  3. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    Desperately sad. The torment these ladies went through.
     
  4. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

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    What an interesting and worthwhile (noble ?) project to be involved in. It makes me wonder how many letters etc must have gone missing over the years. I find this particularly poignant as my late mother lost her first husband in WW2, less than a month after they were married :(
     
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  5. gillyflower

    gillyflower Always caring about others

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    So sad. :(
     
  6. Bonzo Dog

    Bonzo Dog Still the Mad Scientist?

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    I spent some time reading letters, and couldn't help noticing the complete absence of any "it's not fair that it should happen to me" attitude. One writer said she prayed daily for the women whose loved ones were still alive as her brother had at least been set free from the hell of the trenches, while another graciously declined an offer of financial help. She could manage as she had found herself work, far better send money to those unable to do so. For me the saddest part was that Mary was able to welcome her husband back home, only to die in childbirth in 1924.
     

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