Melcombe Regis 1871

Discussion in 'Dorset' started by mugwortismy cat, Sep 7, 2020.

  1. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    I think it’s Larcheveque - there’s a notice in the Southern Times (Dorsetshire Herald) of the 25th February 1871, basically saying that Monsieur J. Larcheveque has been appointed as French Master at the Collegiate School in Weymouth. I think the enumerator has got as close to the original as he could :rolleyes:
     
  2. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Well done @AnnB I think you must have found that newspaper notice at the same time I tracked down his marriage ... :)

    If you fancy a rootle in the newspapers perhaps you can tell me more about William Turner who I found a bit further on -- formerly a joiner, blinded by an explosion, he is 37 in 1871, born Kingsbury, Somerset, married with two children
     
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  3. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    You know I like a good rootle :D
     
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  4. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    This is the gist of it Christel.
    Dorset County Chronicle 14th March 1867
    A shocking accident occurred on Tuesday morning last at the steam saw-mills of Mr Sketchley, in Caroline-place, through the bursting of a four-horse boiler used for driving the machinery connected with the works. A young man named Cosh, aged about eighteen, was killed instantaneously. He was attending to the engine and apparently standing in front of the boiler when the explosion took place. The fire-box of the boiler struck him in the head and literally dashed out his brains, which were scattered about the engine-house. A large piece of the boiler, weighing about l0cwt., was blown through the roof of the workshop and carried for thirty or forty yards across the road, alighting on the top of opposite house, the roof of which it damaged extensively, and other parts of the same house, including the windows, were completely smashed by the detached masses of iron striking them. The workshops and buildings connected with Mr Sketchley's premises were reduced to an utter heap of ruins, the machinery of the engine being entirely destroyed. Two of the workmen employed in the carpenter's shop adjoining the engine-house were severely injured by fragments of the boiler and by the falling of the roof; one of them, named Turner, it is feared will lose his sight, but the other it is hoped will recover.
     
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  5. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Thank you Ann
    It sounds utterly awful :(
     
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  6. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    You can’t begin to imagine it, can you?
     
  7. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I am getting nowhere with the two men in the middle of this snip, I can't even work out the birthplace of the first of them. Hopefully someone else will have the brainwave I am lacking ...

    Screenshot 2020-10-18 at 4.48.36 PM.png

    The second man is Edward (not Coward as it looked at first glance, or Cowan as per Ancestry) Bullock; but is the bit after Bullock a surname such as Janes/Jeans/James or an abbreviation of Junior (although Ive not got an Edward senior so far) o_O
     
  8. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    Is the place a mangled version of Askerswell?
     
  9. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    Edward Bullock Groves (he can be found in 1861 as Tallow chandler in Wesley Street, RG09/1350/49/6)
     
  10. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    William Milverton
    That is FMP's transcription and in 1861 there is a William Milverton in Upwey St. a carter (RG09/1350/61/30) his pob then is Blandford:confused:
     
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  11. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    That's all I can imagine it is, but still can't find the man there
     
  12. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Thank you. I could find any number of Edward Bullock whatevers but that one slipped past me :rolleyes:
     
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  13. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    That's great, thank you. If his birth place is Blandford then I doubt the 1871 is Askerswell. I will dig around a bit and see if I can work it out.
     
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  14. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Looking for guidance on Mary's birthplace

    Screenshot 2020-10-18 at 7.30.35 PM.png
     
  15. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    Ireland Belfast?

    (But the 'f' is a bit odd.)
     
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  16. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    It is a bit odd, but it does fit, especially as I can't find her birth on FreeBMD

    everything in this person's handwriting tends to drift towards the bottom line, I expect if they were really tired all we would get is ___ ____ ___


    Have just found her in 1881 as Maria and yes it is Belfast, well done
    Baptised in Lilleshall, Shropshire 27 Apr 1862, obviously with a previous wife as mother is Maria
     
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  17. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    help please with Florence's occupation (well more properly her husband's) I can imagine it says surgeon or sergeant, but can't get my head around the spelling of it, not can I imagine what a hospital sergeant is o_O

    Screenshot 2020-10-19 at 1.44.06 PM.png

    I have found out that Florence Frances Whitfield married Harry Joseph D Rogers in Sep 1869 Weymouth, if that helps, it didn't help me :sceptical:
     
  18. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    I think it's Hospital Sergeant :) The post is mentioned plenty of times in the papers and this gives you an idea of what was involved, taken from a longer article.
    London Daily News 12th February 1855
    As our military hospital system is the subject of just comment at the present moment, as it has proved defective, and as an alteration must be sooner or later made, may not a few lines on the position of hospital sergeant, as it now exists, be useful? Also a few suggestions, showing how this non-commissioned officer's services might be rendered more useful, and some remarks on the inapplicability or inutility of the position of ward master? The regimental hospital sergeant is at present chosen from among the sergeants of the regiment. He may or he may not be an intelligent man. He is charged with the safe custody of the public property in the hospital, the maintenance of discipline among the patients and attendants, the cleanliness of the whole of the apartments and of the patients. It is his duty to see that the orders of the surgeon regarding the administering of diet and medicine at the appointed hours are carried into effect, and he has also to render assistance in keeping the accounts of the hospital, and in making up the medical returns. It is evident, therefore, that his office is essential. It is worthy of observation that this non-commissioned officer oft times has under his charge his seniors, he being but a sergeant. It is clear also that the efficiency of a regiment to a very great extent may be attributable to the manner in which the discipline of its hospital establishment is conducted; for if there is any laxity in this respect, the hospital, instead of being a nursery and retreat for the sick soldier, will become the retort of the scheming and the lazy (many of such being found in every regiment), as also the means of defeating the ends of justice in preventing the execution of punishment due to crime. The hospital sergeant should possess, to a certain extent, a knowledge of the character of the men of the regiment, and of the causes of the appearance of any of them at the hospital as sick, so as to put the surgeon in possession of statements which, while he attends to the complaint of the soldier, will lead him to ascertain, by minute inquiry, whether the symptoms of such complaint are manifest, and thus prevent imposition.
     
  19. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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  20. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Probably a very silly question but is the D.L. in Charles Robert Belsey's occupation simply mean Dock Labourer?

    Screenshot 2020-10-19 at 8.19.26 PM.png
     
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