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Schoolmasters late 1790s to early 1800s

Discussion in 'Teaching' started by BonnieB, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. BonnieB

    BonnieB New Member

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    Good morning .......

    My husband's 3x gt grandfather was Thomas Wood - bc 1771 of Bishops Frome, Herefordshire. He was described as a Schoolmaster during his time at Stretton Grandison, HER. 1801 to at least 1813.
    We next find him on the 1841 Census at Bodenham described as a Cordwainer.

    He died at Bodenham. His Obit - Hereford Times Newspaper, Page 3, 30 Oct 1841.
    "Oct. 23, at Bodenham, in the 69th year of his age, Mr Thomas Wood, formerly of Stretton Grandsome, and for many years master of Mason's Charity School in the parish of Bodenham." [I have his Will].

    Would anyone know what would be the training for teachers in that early time period & any suggestions of why the big career change?

    Thanking you ...... BonnieB
     
  2. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

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    I'd like to know, too. I have one in Scotland who was a teacher, but by the time he married was a fruiterer. I think the second job paid better. Was Thomas Wood married with family at any time during his schoolmaster days?

    Sorry, not more helpful.
     
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  3. Chimp

    Chimp Moderator & Cheeky Human IMP Staff Member

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    I don't have school masters but I do have a school teacher in my tree. It was my great grandmother. The only reason I can find for her being a school teacher was that she could read and write, whereas the others in her community couldn't.
     
  4. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    Not sure that this TNA Research Guide will help too much with the late 18th century research... :(

    I have an ancestor who was a pupil teacher at the age of 14. She showed an aptitude for reading and writing and so learnt under the guidance of the Headmaster. I think that is how a lot of them learnt in the early days.
    The following website also gives an insight into happenings in Scotland:
    Code:
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/education/about-us/maps-estates-history/history/part-one
     
  5. Chimp

    Chimp Moderator & Cheeky Human IMP Staff Member

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    My grandmothers had two brothers who were also pupil teachers near Sheffield. one was Charles H. Evans age 13 years 10 months, Woodside School, paid 2/6 per week from 25 Oct 1886

    Their father had been a scripture reader.
     
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  6. BonnieB

    BonnieB New Member

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    Yes - he married in 1799 when he was around 28 yrs old & they had 9 children. He was a schoolmaster / teacher after his move to Bodenham 1813 + - think it would've been in his latter years he changed careers.
     
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  7. BonnieB

    BonnieB New Member

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    Thanks for the site - but TNA Research mainly talks 1840 + :reading:
     
  8. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    My 'schoolmaster' was employed around 1810, when he was barely more than a child himself and then opened his own school. I do know that he received a good education, and as Chimp implies above, if someone had the necessary skills in reading, writing and arithmetic then they would be in demand as a teacher.

    My ancestor changed career, too - perhaps teaching didn't pay so well. Classes would be very small, I'd imagine.
     
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  9. BonnieB

    BonnieB New Member

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    In Scotland, the schools were run & paid for by the parish so everyone could attend if they wish.

    Where as in England, pre mid 1800's, you paid to give your kids an education. There were free Masons Charity Schools, but they were few & far between.

    Just received this from an Archivist: in ref pre 1830 school teachers - "at that date they would not have had any formal qualifications or attended a special school. Some school masters may have been licensed by the Diocese."
     
  10. BonnieB

    BonnieB New Member

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    I've just bought the Marriage licence for my Thomas Wood's marriage in 1799 - he was listed as a cordwainer on that document. So sometime after the marriage, he was a schoolmaster & then by 1841, back to a shoe maker. :)
     

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