Shipwright- Leather worker

Discussion in 'Other Occupations & Trades' started by Ma-dotcom, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

    Offline
    Messages:
    6,168
    Likes Received:
    15,717
    Location:
    South Australia
    I've just listened to a chap using 'leather filler' on a damaged leather chair back--he nearly talked me back to sleep but I persevered.
    I do cling to the thought that my chap may have had to do with the manufacturing side of leather wear more than selling. Probably because so many rellies were so occupied.

    Yesterday i read something about fillers to do with decorations on leather & ofcourse didn't keep it to hand. Not good on long searches at the mo'.

    "Leather Currier : Tanned leather by incorporating oil or grease " if skins were damaged would they have had to repair / fill in cracks or damaged areas? I probably won't go to the extent of looking for an expert in this field but will always wonder I think.
    Having just re read posts from yesterday-so long ago- I can now see that he didn't have to be one to be one. Member that is o_O. I can let him rest in there now as I don''t think he had very long left to so do.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2017
    Sis likes this.
  2. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

    Offline
    Messages:
    2,874
    Likes Received:
    12,635
    Location:
    North Devon, England
    The title of Leatherseller's Company is a bit misleading as, over the years, members of the company were involved in all forms of leatherwork, not just selling - this from the Leatherseller's Company's web site;

    The manufacture of leather in Roman and medieval London was concentrated on the northern fringes of the City, where the river Walbrook provided a plentiful water supply for the tanning process and the noxious fumes attendant upon it could not offend the noses of local residents. The finished hides were sold in markets throughout the City, notably in Leadenhall market
    In the nineteenth century Leadenhall market was superseded by the Leather, Hide and Wool Exchange in Bermondsey. Lying just across the Thames from the City and beyond the restrictive jurisdiction of the City authorities, Bermondsey was geographically and geologically suited to the manufacture of leather. There is evidence of leatherworking here from earliest times, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was estimated that one third of all leather produced in the country was manufactured in Bermondsey, gaining the area its nickname – “the land of leather”. It was here that the Leathersellers’ Company chose to locate its Technical College, but after the boom years of the nineteenth century, decline came swiftly. Bermondsey suffered heavy bombing during World War Two with the loss of many tanneries.
     
    Bonzo Dog, Ma-dotcom and Sis like this.
  3. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

    Offline
    Messages:
    6,168
    Likes Received:
    15,717
    Location:
    South Australia
    Thank you Ann I did read that, so many aspects of the leather trade to compile into.....?
     
    AnnB and Sis like this.
  4. Londoner

    Londoner Will always roll up her sleeves and dig around

    Offline
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    2,571
    Location:
    Cornwall
    More years ago than I care to remember, I knew a student at the Leathersellers college. I was given a small piece of leather tanned and dyed by said individual.
    Leather workers abound in my husband's line, one of his gt gt uncles went up in the world and became a portmanteau maker!
     
    AnnB, Sis and Ma-dotcom like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice