Some sort of epidemic?

Discussion in 'Sussex' started by Blackmogs, Feb 7, 2019.

  1. Blackmogs

    Blackmogs Moderator. General Dogs(cats)body. Staff Member

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    Whilst looking at images for Souters on Familysearch thanks to @AnnB. I came across this.

    Parish register of Angmering which includes Poling burials 1859:

    Stephen Sowter on 3rd May age 6
    Jane Suter on 7 November age 3
    Richard Suter on 16th November age 36 (my 2nd great grandfather)
    then
    Stephen Edmunds 25 November age 10
    James Edmunds 6 December age 12
    Amy Edmunds 19 December age 15

    I wonder what happened in Poling that year? Fancy losing 3 children from the same family in a matter of weeks.
    :(
     
  2. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    In 1858, there was a diphtheria outbreak in the southern counties - I have a couple of deaths in my family at that time on the Sussex/Kent border. Possibly the years before and after as well. :(
     
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  3. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman

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    That's interesting. There was in fact a diptheria epidemic throughout the country 1856-1859. In Creighton's A History of Epidemics in Britain (page 740) he notes that in 1859 'The highest death-rate was in Lincolnshire....Sussex, Kent, Essex and Norfolk also had high death-rates.'

    Code:
    https://archive.org/details/historyofepidemi02crei/page/741

    Beat me to it Jan!
     
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  4. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    So pleased that my memory had not deserted me, @Flook ! In my family, it was 2 sisters just 6 weeks apart. :(
     
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  5. Blackmogs

    Blackmogs Moderator. General Dogs(cats)body. Staff Member

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    Those Souters were Richard's children, we think we have it tough. Thanks for the info you two, I thought it might be some sort of disease.
     
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  6. Dogsday

    Dogsday Active Member

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    from The Independent Newspaper 2005

    In towns across England in 1918, a new nursery rhyme was
    heard in school playgrounds.
    Britain and the rest of Europe had suffered a gruelling war and
    after four years of struggle, the nation was looking forward to
    peace. But for the young, far from distant battlefields, there was
    something else on their minds, something whose effects they
    witnessed. As they skipped rope they sang:

    I had a little bird
    Its name was Enza
    I opened the window,
    And in-flu-enza.

    As the Great War was ending, a threat emerged that was even
    more lethal than the fighting that had brutally cut down so many
    young men. The influenza pandemic of 1918-19 claimed the
    lives of between 20 and 40 million people around the world, at
    least three times the number killed in the war. More died in a
    single year than were killed in the four years of the Black Death
    from 1347-51.
     

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