Transcription assistance please!

Discussion in 'Church Records' started by MarkJ, May 25, 2015.

  1. MarkJ

    MarkJ Well-Known Member

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    minutes.jpg Hope someone can help with this!

    It is from a Vestry Minutes book and refers to a bridge over a stream near my home.
    I can read most of the entry -
    ..."a similar manner to Quarry bridge. A (unable to read the next two words - first one seems to start with a capital S) is also recommended to be placed over the stream, below the gate"

    Any help most appreciated.

    Mark :)
     
  2. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    I'm sure the first word is 'Swimming'.
     
  3. patten-walsh

    patten-walsh Well-Known Member

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    Larger.jpg First word could be "Servicing
     
  4. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    First thoughts were "Scrivening rack" which seems to make no sense. Flook's "Swimming" is, I think, correct ;) ... can still make nothing sensible of the second word
     
  5. patten-walsh

    patten-walsh Well-Known Member

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    but,Flook looks to be right......
     
  6. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    'Swimming rack' has some hits on Google. It's where you hang clothes if people go…..swimming:)
     
  7. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    The first letter is an r as it's the same as in recommended. Do you have a K in the minutes at all?
     
  8. MarkJ

    MarkJ Well-Known Member

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    Both swimming and servicing crossed my mind, but the second word may be the one which gives the answer.
    The "river" in question is only about 6 inches deep at best and, from looking at old maps etc I doubt it was ever really much deeper. It does become a lot deeper in winter during heavy rain - and can flood the road and submerge the bridge.
    I can't think of anything like a service gate or remains of one there. The house still stands and the little "bridge" too
     
  9. MarkJ

    MarkJ Well-Known Member

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    Yep, hang on! mintes2.jpg

    Does look awfully like the R in river doesn't it (assuming the word after Rosewyn is actually river)?
     
  10. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    Sorry I meant the "recommended" in the second line of the example :). So that's an r - is there a K?
     
  11. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    Ah! do we have our lines crossed over a K? I read the second extract as "That the Surveyors do give notice to Bassett to put a new gate, of a fair width, at….."
     
  12. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

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    Is the waterway, you said a ditch, a diversion stream? If so, a "swimming rack" might be a way for fish to navigate when the gate is closed. Need to do some more googling.
     
  13. MarkJ

    MarkJ Well-Known Member

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    Mr Bassett ;) A fairly important chap in the area at the time! No K in this particular Vestry minute, although there must be one somewhere in there!

    I am now pretty convinced it states Swimming Rack though!

    GrannyBarb - I don't think it is a diversion type stream. There are several similar ones in this area and eventually they all seem to end up in the River Fal.
    But it may have been some method for fish to pass I guess.. not that there are many fish in there that I have seen, just a few very tiny little trout.
     
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  14. crazycatlady22

    crazycatlady22 Well-Known Member

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    What is the date on these records? whatever the item is, it goes OVER the stream. Could the second word be lock?
     
  15. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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    Here I go putting in my little bit! Could it be a servicing rack. Maybe to clear the rubbish buildup from the gate in the stream during a flood. Somewhere to stand to do the job without being washed downstream!
     
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  16. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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    All of course depends as crazycatlady asks, i.e the date of the entry. Swimming wasn't always the done thing! Wasn't it referred to as 'bathing'?
     
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  17. crazycatlady22

    crazycatlady22 Well-Known Member

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    Yes my thoughts exactly, I was sure that "swimming" was referred to as Bathing. Even now in the land of OZ a lot of people cannot swim but they do paddle around with their feet.
     
  18. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    I am convinced it says "swimming rack" but can't fit that into context......I did wonder if it had anything to do with a rack marsh, which is a type of wet meadowland, but that doesn't help with the swimming bit, unless it is to do with fish being able to navigate the bit of river? Were there fishing rights there, perhaps owned by the Bassett family? From what you say Mark, it sounds a bit unlikely as the water is so shallow. Could it be to do with eels?

    Tell us what date this is and I'll see if I can turn up anything in the papers

    Ann
     
  19. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I was toying with "Screening rack" which I was envisaging as some kind of filtration device ... but the more I look at it the more convinced I am that it says "Swimming" ...
     
  20. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman. Rest in Peace.

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    Funnily enough I looked up "swimming" in the Oxford English Dictionary and it is in fact a centuries-old word. However, there was one definition in there which caught my eye and that was cited in an 1833 Encyclopedia of Cottage Architecture viz: " 'Swimming - a thing which floats upon the surface' [as in] 'The swimmings, or light grains that are skimmed off in the cistern' ".

    It seems to me that it could be a 'catching' system as Mugsworthy says, to stop detritus etc being taken further down the river from that point (as ever, over time, the flow of rivers, brooks etc can change dramatically).
     

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