Transportation

Discussion in 'Criminal Ancestors' started by Helen, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. Helen

    Helen Member

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    I have a ancestor who had been transported twice I wondered how this could have happened but on doing a lot of research I found that the first time he never left the country
    It seems that being transported sometimes meant that you served your sentence on a prison hulk which were moored up say on the Thames and then released which is what happened to my ancestor
    The second time he actually ended up in Tasmania served his time and died in Hobart aged 90
    I have managed to find a great deal about him using the Convict Records Of Austraila
     
  2. Doug

    Doug Administrator. The Main Man. Staff Member

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    Hi Helen,

    Interesting the way that was recorded isn't it? Can be very confusing.

    Convict Records Of Australia is a great site.
     
  3. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Great air in Tassie/Hobart Helen, they seem to have lived a long life.
     
  4. Malcolm Webb

    Malcolm Webb Well-Known Member

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    My wife has an ancestor who was sentenced to 7 years transportation for Grand Larceny in 1824. He was transferred from Nottingham Gaol to the "Ganymede" at Woolwich before being transferred to the "Captivity" at Devonport. I couldn't find him anywhere in the Convict records for Australia. Then I went carefully over the records for the prison ships before discovering that he received a pardon for good behaviour in 1828 after serving over one-half his sentence.

    Lesson learned -- make sure they have left this country before searching overseas records. :)

    All the best,
    Maalcolm Webb
    Lincoln UK
     
  5. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    Ah, that's interesting, Helen. One of my husband's ancestors was convicted of chicken stealing and sent to a hulk for a few months. Then he was transferred to a convict ship bound for Oz.

    It took the best part of a year to get there.
     
  6. Mealymoo

    Mealymoo A Busy Lizzy

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    So many of us had ancestors transported. My transportee was brother of my 2 x great grandfather; his life in Tas and later in NSW is well documented, the Tas records are super. My chap was 19yrs when sent to Tas and apparently very wilful, he habitually did runners from his master and consequently had to serve more than his original seven year sentence. After his marriage he settled down and 'made good'. He told his children he was an officer at Port Arthur, he got away with that fib until one of his descendants visited Tasmania and found the truth.
     
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  7. Helen

    Helen Member

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    Malcolm wonder if Isaac Chafer and your wife's ancestor ever met as Isaac was on the "Ganymede" in 1826
     
  8. Malcolm Webb

    Malcolm Webb Well-Known Member

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    They could have been on the same work-gang. I don't know the actual date he left the "Ganymede" but he was certainly there in June 1826.

    All the best,
    Malcolm Webb
    Lincoln UK
     
  9. Helen

    Helen Member

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    A small world that seems to get closer all the time
     
  10. Malcolm Webb

    Malcolm Webb Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to mention -- my wife's ancestor was Thomas Tutbury. He broke into a druggist store in Nottingham and stole some coins and 2 ten pound notes (a fortune in 1824). He went to Derby where he used one to buy a silver watch at a pawn shop and the other to buy some "trowsers" at a tailors. The Tailor couldn't change the note so he sent out for some change. His assistant came back with a bobby. I suppose Thomas Tutbury looked as though he hadn't 2 ha'pennies to rub together so having a ten pound note, let alone 2, raised some suspicions. Tried at Nottingham on 15 January 1824 and sentenced to 7 years transportation. Received a King's Pardon and was released on 11 August 1828. Sadly, we cannot find any record of him after his release.

    All the best,
    Malcolm Webb
    Lincoln UK
     
  11. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    It appears that one of 'mine' was transported to Bermuda - conditions sound horrific over there as disease was rife, and they were housed on hulks in insufferable heat for the duration of their sentence, if indeed they lasted that long. No ticket of leave, as in Oz.
     
  12. Huncamunca

    Huncamunca The Knowledgeable One

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    I have been researching the story of three Oxfordshire men who were sent to Bermuda for stealing turkeys. I knew that two survived and returned to Oxfordshire (one stayed here, and has descendants here; the other decided to try his luck in Australia, but went on the ill-fated 'Cataraqui' and so never made it).

    The fate of the third, Joshua Oliver, had been unknown for a long time. From the Bermuda hulk registers at Kew I discovered that he had died out there. Then I looked at the records of the hospital there, and found a graphic description by the doctor who was treating him, of how he had been reduced to a 'perfect skeleton' by dysentery. Though Joshua is not related to me, I found it quite spine-tingling to have in my hands the very book that had once been in Bermuda, in the hands of the doctor who tried but failed to save Joshua.
     
  13. Sandiep

    Sandiep Successfully Supports Searches!

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    what always surprises me is the fact that so many of those transported married again in Australia even though they had a family back home......I have 3 at least that did this my ggrandfather John Rosier, his brother and my gggrandmother Elizabeth Webb.....all left wives and children and in case of Elizabeth husband & 4 children...........life was so different then
     
  14. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Guessing those men missed & needed family life & had no money to bring out their own families even if they wanted to do so, a scary thought to uproot & go to a strange & harsh land.
    Ithink from memory things were a little easier for family men, who could more easily get access to their own land.
     
  15. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    Yes, cost of sending for family would have been prohibitive. :(
     
  16. spison

    spison Well-Known Member

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    Yet many did have a wife and children come. Some men were then assisgned as servants to their free wife.
    Jane
     
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  17. Stafford

    Stafford Well-Known Member

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    My husband's 3x GGrandmother was one of the wives left behind in England. Her husband was sentenced to death for stealing a horse. His sentence was commuted to transportation for life. She remarried after 7 years.
     
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  18. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Good for her, she still had a life to live.
     
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  19. HildaW

    HildaW Well-Known Member

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    I once read that the spouse left behind in England could have the marriage annulled, if they chose to do so, on the date the convict ship sailed. I know of a wife who did that except she married a few days before the ship sailed, perhaps the sailing date was delayed and this was not known in Sheffield. She married and "lived happily ever after" with the children from her convict husband and more. He got a ticket of leave and married an Irish girl and had many children.
    Hilda
     
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