Tregear Line.

Discussion in 'Cornwall' started by Jennie, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    I am a descendant of Keverne (aka Henerie) Tregear b. 1585 in Cornwall. Where, I'm not sure. He married Margaret ? b.1586 also in Cornwall. Keverne's son, James b. 1626 in St Just married Jane Warne. Their son Richard Trigger was born in Chulmleigh Devon in 1665. From there on my research leads me to Devon.

    Does any member know the history of the name Tregear? I was told that two brothers Tregear arrived in Cornwall from Normandy round about the time of William the Conquerer. I also learned from the Patronymica Cornu - Brittanica that the Tregeares came from Tregeare in the Parish of Crowan where the family were resident as late as 1782. Richard Tregeare was sheriff of the county in 1704. It also tells me that Tregeare means 'the green or fruitful place'.
    I am hoping to come to Cornwall for a holiday next May/June and I am just wanting to come forearmed with as much information about the Tregeares as I can.
    Thank you. Fingers crossed.
     
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  2. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

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    Hi, Jennie and welcome.

    The "tre" surname prefix is extremely common in Cornwall. It means place of, home of, homestead of, or similar idea. If you are searching for a pre-cornish origin, I would suggest losing the prefix and focus on the variations of "gear."

    Here's a broken link to a page you may have seen before (board policy is to break links to sites with monetary motives, so I'm placing a space between the dot and the com):
    http://www. surnamedb.com/Surname/Tregear

    Hope that helps.
    Regards,
    Barb
     
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  3. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    Thank you Barb for your reply and advice. I found the Cornish surname site very interesting and will now proceed to research look for any pre-Cornish information using the 'gear' name although I don't hold out much hope for anything conclusive. Thank you again.
     
  4. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

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    Hi, Jennie.
    We have several members who live in Cornwall and could probably give you some pre-visit pointers. Also, if you have specific ancestors you want help in researching, they're pretty skillful at that, too. ;)

    I'm in the US and have Treleaven's who went to Canada from Cornwall via Devon. A couple of years ago I was asking the same questions you are asking now. Otherwise I wouldn't know a bit about this subject. :reading:

    Ask away, that's why we're here! :)
     
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  5. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    Thanks Barb. That's very encouraging. I can't wait to start tapping the rich source of information available from this great site.
     
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  6. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    I live in Australia, not Cornwall, but many of my husband's ancestors come from St. Just. And last October I took a good few photos of gravestones in the St Just churchyards (Parish and Wesleyan Chapel) and then researched the deceased persons. So with a good many St Just people in my tree I thought I'd see what Tregears I have and here I am hours later having been working my way backwards. Along the way I continue to be amazed at how often the names repeat. For instance: two Grace Tregear born four years apart (1760 and 1764) with different parents. One married a William Tregear the other a John Wallis/Wallish. Then I realised that the one who married the Wallis was the sister of William Tregear who married the other Grace. Oooh I love St. Just genealogy: it's the best jigsaw puzzle ever! ;)
     
  7. Londoner

    Londoner Will always roll up her sleeves and dig around

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    You just mentioned a name that drives me nuts. In every generation of the Wallis(h) family there are innumerable Johns, Thomas's and Roberts!
     
  8. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    I have a few of those Wallis(h) Johns, Thomas' and Roberts too! But I just counted 15 John Harveys and 21 Thomas Veal(e)s
     
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  9. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    Hi Peregrine, I agree! So many John's in my Tregeare line. Makes it even more difficult when the surname changes by a letter here and there over the centuries, too. I did a coach tour of Cornwall in 2011 and just can't wait to come back again. Does anyone else experience the strangeness of a sense of belonging to a place/country you have never been to before? I couldn't wait to get to UK (Cornwall/Devon the first time) It felt like a homecoming yet I have lived in NZ all my life. Is it possible one can inherit memory genes from ancestors? Interesting thought!
     
  10. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    As this question generated a lot of discussion away from the original topic, I have moved those posts to a thread of their own. Click here to find them. :)
     
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  11. SebastianTre

    SebastianTre New Member

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    Hello, my name is Sebastian Tregear, I am 17 years old and I am from the city of Lima, Peru. I'm here because I'm interested in knowing the origin of my family, since (sure as many) they lost track, and I mainly have 3 questions:
    1. What is the exact meaning of the name Tregear?
    2. The cornicos that are ?, I read that their culture is more Celtic than Anglo-Saxon, and when they ask me, I do not know if my surname is English or Celtic (ah, and could they also chronicles me ethically?). blond or red hair or black hair, or their eye color too, if they are tall or short, etc)
    3. My exact origin, my grandfather Victor Tregear told me his father Manuel Tregear was from Arica (Peruvian city of that time, nowadays is Chilean) and that the pope of my great-grandfather Manuel is the Tregear who arrived here, the thing My grandfather knows nothing about him, since he died when he was very young and never asked his father about him, and well, I wanted to know if he was a corwall, or ers Australian or New Zealander, since I saw that there are many Tregear in those countries, by chance someone knows something about the immigration of cornicos to Latin America (Peru mainly) or Australian or New Zealand immigration or some country with a high density of Cornish immigrants to Latin America?
    thank you very much.;)
     
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  12. Londoner

    Londoner Will always roll up her sleeves and dig around

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    There has been a lot of work done on the Cornish who went to Latin America, and a book was published by the Cornubian Press. It was a limited edition but you might find it via a library. It is possible that your ancestors came via Australia as the Cornish went whereever mines were being developed after the Cornish tin industry declined.
    There is a link in post 2 above to a definition of the name, which can be traced back to the 1500s .
     
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  13. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

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    Hi, Sebastian. Welcome! :)
    Do you have any dates for Manuel? Birth, marriage, death or at least your Grandfather's year of birth? We try to avoid discussing living people, so keep that in mind.
     
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  14. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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    Hi Sebastian. Found the following on a BBC site.
    'Struggling at home, Cornish miners were not slow to grasp the opportunities created by the discovery of gold, silver and copper in the New World. Moving offered the chance of better pay and conditions, and the opportunity to rise to a position of responsibility more quickly. Some men like Richard Trevithick returned to Cornwall having made great reputations for themselves.

    The Cornish led the world in mining technology and innovation at this time, and had been exporting machinery since the early-19th Century. Richard Trevithick took high-pressure steam engines to the silver mines of Peru in 1816, heralding the start of a global mining economy. This export of technology paved the way for the “export” of miners, as skilled men were required to install and work this sophisticated machinery'.
    The above Richard Trevithick is a little leaf on a far off branch of my family tree so any mention of Cornish miners attracts my attention. As you can see the Cornish seem to have arrived after Richard and his three companions paved the way around 1816.
    Do you have a name for Manuel's father? As you probably know Cornish family history is well documented on Cornwall OPC so a name may find some little spark of information to follow up.
    I certainly hope that we can help.
     
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  15. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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  16. SebastianTre

    SebastianTre New Member

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    Hello everyone, sorry for taking so long to respond, my great grandfather was born in 1906 if I remember correctly, in the city of Arica, thanks for that BBC information also, one more thing, I saw that Cornicos was Bretons (Celts of that zone) and not their ethnicity and culture was not affected by the Anglo-Saxons almost nothing, so when they ask me where my name is, I do not know if it is English or Celtic. What is correct?
     
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  17. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    I have a little booklet explaining Cornish Placenames in which it is stated “The Cornish language is directly descended from the Celtic of ancient Gaul and pre-Roman Britain....Its closest relatives are Welsh and Breton and it has kinship with Irish, Scottish and Manx Gaelic.”

    Your name, Tre, is a Cornish name and means farm or village. Place names beginning with TRE often relate to the settlement’s founder.

    Source: 1000 Cornish Place Names by Julyan Holmes
     
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  18. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    Correction: the booklet is called 1000 Cornish Place Names Explained.
     
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  19. GwasTreger

    GwasTreger New Member

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    Sebastian, Tregear is a surname in the Cornish language, a Celtic language like Welsh and Breton. It derives from the Cornish place name "treger" from the two words "tre" (homestead, settlement) and "ker" (fort). In Cornish we 'mutate' the first letters of words under certain circumstances - here "k" becomes "g". The name means 'homestead [by the] fort'. (The 'fort' in this context is usually an old Celtic hill fort, an ancient fortified dwelling.) There are several places in Cornwall called Tregear, and families who originated from those places may still carry the name. As suggested, the place called Tregear near Crowan is one likely origin for your family, but there are several more in Cornwall. The fact that someone in your family may have been called Keverne, could also suggest an origin near the village of St Keverne. Many Cornish people went to the Americas and to Australia - they were often highly valued because of their mining skills. What is your source for a Keverne Tregear, and your link with him? I might be able to suggest further lines of enquiry. You will also perhaps know of a famous Cornish priest of around the same time, John Tregear, who translated Bishop Bonner's Homilies into the Cornish Language in the time of Queen Mary I.
     
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