Trowell & Hammer Pub

Discussion in 'Newspapers & Other Publications' started by Eve, Apr 3, 2020.

  1. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    Hope everyone is keeping safe and well, but enjoying this excuse to spend lots of time on research !
    Before I drive myself completely mad I am hoping someone on here might be able to help me find a newspaper article. I'm sure I didn't dream it but can't find it anywhere now. Have checked laptops, iPad, external hard drives, memory sticks et al and can't find a sniff of it :headbang:
    My 3XGt Grandmother Eliza GOODEY was licensee of the Trowell & Hammer Pub in Great Tey, Essex certainly between 1870 -1880 maybe longer. I had an article where she was up before the magistrates for selling short measures, I think it was. I have searched again on BNA with no luck, but I cant think where else I would have originally found it?
    I'm hoping fresh eyes from here might be able to locate.
    Thanks in advance
    Lesley
     
  2. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    Try the Essex Standard 25th August 1871 - she was named as Eliza Goody :)
     
  3. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    thank you Ann, knew it would be you to save me :)
    :p:p =Nearest smiley I could find to a blush.
    Rookie error. So many of my Goodeys are listed as Goody even Gooday. I think panic mode just took over ! Also, I see a couple more mentions - even the transfer of the Trowell & Hammer licence in 1866 - earlier than I thought.
    Thank you x
     
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  4. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    No problem Eve :)There are quite a few mentions of the Trowel(l) and Hammer as well as Eliza, there are a couple for Albert and Harry Goody - her sons?
     
  5. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    Yes they are 2 of her sons - Albert is my great great grandfather Joseph Albert - don’t tell me they were up to no good too :)
     
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  6. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    Then I think this is your gt gt grandfather - sorry :nailbiting: Had you 'lost' him from the 1871 census?
    Essex Standard 6th January 1871
    Albert Goody, 32, dealer, was charged with stealing a gelding, the property of John Jones, at Lambourne.—Mr Pearce for the prosecution; Mr Wood for the defence. — Prisoner formerly lived at Marks Tey, and the prosecutor is executor of a relative who lived at Abridge. — His horse was safe on the 27th of April last, and the next day it was missed. It was afterwards seen in the possession of prisoner, at his mother's house, the Trowel and Hammer inn, Marks Tey, and on the 4th May, prisoner sold the horse at Copdock, Suffolk. When apprehended in London, he said he had purchased it of George Walters, a "horse coper" like himself, and he produced a receipt. — Prisoner was found guilty, and sentenced to 12 months' hard labour.
     
  7. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    Well what do you know ! Well, of course you know so well as usual :) Yep, when I take a look I have his whereabouts up to his death in 1923 except the 1871 census ! Thank you once again x
     
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  8. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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  9. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    Following on from @AnnB ’s help with Elizabeth & Joseph Albert GOODEY (GOODY) and HIS whereabouts in 1871, it reminded me that in the year in question my GtGrandfather Edward was born. Randomly, he was born in the West Ham district and I don’t know why. Looking again at Elizabeth’s 1871 census entry, FMP has the address listed as Wood House Asylum, Wanstead, which threw me a bit. But the only Wanstead Asylum references I can find are for orphan asylums, which would appear to tie up with the entries on the previous pages which are all children. But I can find no mention of Wood House.
    The previous pages have a schedule number of 76 but Eliza’s I think is a Different schedule number of 77 going by the tick in the inhabited column. So I think I am right in thinking that she wasn’t necessarily an inhabitant of the asylum. But there are no other street references that I can see, so don’t know if the address is associated with asylum even.

    Class: RG10; Piece: 1635; Folio: 120; Page: 26

    1871 census was taken 2nd April
    Edward was baptised 2 Jun 1871 in Leytonstone, so still in the area.
    Unfortunately I don’t think I have Edward’s birth certificate for address - will try and order (if they are still working?)
     
  10. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    i’ve had a quick look at the papers and found this in the Essex Standard for the 29th April 1864
    Samuel Gurney Esq., M.P. has consented to preside at the opening of Wood House Asylum for the protection of Young Females, which is fixed to take place on the 18th of the ensuing month.

    So, maybe it was set up as a place for unmarried mothers? I’ll have another look tomorrow.
     
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  11. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    There is quite a lot in the papers about Wood House (or Woodhouse). The following is taken from a long article about the setting up of the establishment.
    Essex Standard 25th May 1864
    Society for the Protection of Young Females. Opening of the Home at Wanstead - Nine-and-twenty years ago a girl, under 14 years of age, came from Norfolk to London in search of relatives, whom she believed to live here. Ignorant of the metropolis, she was met by an apparently respectable woman, who proffered her a night's lodging and assistance in tracing out her friends. She was induced to remain in the house a second night, from which time she was lost to herself and to the world; her life from that period was a chain — short enough, of enforced guilt and misery, every link blackened by some new and revolting horror. In three weeks she bad sunk into a pauper's grave, morally, though not legally, murdered. The case excited no sensation at the time, but it attracted the attention of one good and benevolent man, Mr. J. B. Talbot, the Secretary of the present "Society for the Protection of Young Females," and he at once set about organizing a means of defeating and bringing to justice those who, lost lo every sense of shame and every feeling of humanity and kindness to their own sex, for the sake of gain, dragged others into the pit into which they had already fallen….
    ….the Committee resolved to purchase Wood House, lately the property of Money Wigram, Esq. It consists of a large commodious house with about four acres of land. The buildings on the property were just such as the institution required. All that needed to be added was a school-room and dining-room, which have been erected……
    ....The girls admitted into this asylum are instructed in the Bible, reading, writing, and arithmetic, and the other branches of a simple English education; and, what is equally important, they are trained in the various branches of domestic duties, so as to fit them for service in respectable families; and they are usually not sent away from the institution until they can be recommended to those requiring their services as good and trustworthy servants. It is a satisfactory evidence of the sufficiency of the teaching which they receive that generally those who have once had a girl from the institution apply for others when they are in need of servants. After the formal opening of the building on Wednesday the children underwent an examination into their knowledge of the Scriptures, mental arithmetic, history, geography, and domestic economy. Any visitor was invited to ask them questions, a privilege of which some gentlemen availed themselves; and the readiness with which the children answered was quite surprising. They all showed themselves equally apt at telling the visitors how to clean a room, to make a plum-pudding, to fry fish, to serve up a dinner, to wash, and indeed to perform any of a woman's household duties; and if they will only act when in service on the knowledge that they now display in domestic economy, every one of these girls on going into service will be a treasure to her employer, who will become the fortunate possessor of that most scarce article — a perfect domestic servant.....
     
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  12. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    As far as I can see Wood House was on Hollybush Hill, and from looking at the entry for Elizabeth, and the other families that appear on the pages, after what is obviously the asylum residents they appear to be living in other properties. There ar a couple of 'u's in the unihabited column, suggesting they were not part of the asylum.

    I did try Hollybush Hill, as an adress search on 1871 census FMP, and got no results found, but it there in 1881.
     
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  13. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    I wonder, as Elizabeth is described as a dressmaker in 1871, if she could have been working for the 'asylum' making the girl's clothes?
     
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  14. Genie1

    Genie1 Well-Known Member

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    I ordered a certificate on the 23 March and the despatch date was 30 March. The Application progress:In progress. Not received it yet.
    Their message is:

    Coronavirus

    Following the introduction of the latest measures relating to non-essential work to reduce the spread of Covid-19, we may not be able to complete orders within the published timescales.

    To help ensure that our services are accessible to those that need them most throughout this period, if you are able to do so we would ask that you delay making your order until a later date.

    During this period we will not be able to provide information on the progress of orders, but please keep checking this page for further updates.
     
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  15. Eve

    Eve Well-Known Member

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    Hi all, thank you for your help. You have confirmed my first thoughts - I don’t think her dwelling is the asylum itself, although, as Ann says, she could be working for them and the dwelling connected to the main house somehow. It’s not vital, so I may order birth certificate when things calm down a bit (heaven knows how long that might be) to see if it has more info re the address. x
     

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