What would they have brought with them?

Discussion in 'Migration & Shipping' started by Peregrine, Jan 12, 2017.

  1. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    My step-grandmother, whom we called Aunty, married my maternal grandfather when I was nearly 5, she was 52 and my grandfather was 58. My grandmother had died 2 and a half years earlier. Aunty was also my grandfather's first cousin and after they married he went to live in her home with her mother and his Aunt (who had married his father's brother)

    Needless to say she was the grandmother I knew and she went on to live till she was 94. I was very close to Aunty and around the age of 90 she assigned power of attorney to me, and I acted as the executor of her will. But long before that she gave me some oak leaves from a table that she said had come from Ireland when her mother's family emigrated to Australia. The idea was that the big lad and I would make a coffee table or some such from the oak, but that never happened.

    I have offered the oak leaves to my daughter and her boyfriend to make a table and was showing the leaves to them tonight and telling them what Aunty had told me about their origin. Then I looked up the family on my tree and determined that Aunty's great grandparents arrived at Port Phillip in 1841. So if they brought the oak table with them it was older than that. Which leads me to ask, what would our migrant ancestors have brought with them? It should be noted that the occupations of Aunty's ancestors were listed as labourer and house servant, so they were not exactly well off.

    I have to say I'd always assumed that most migrants brought very little with them. I'd be interested in your thoughts and perhaps someone knows if there are records of what items migrants brought with them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
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  2. gillyflower

    gillyflower Always caring about others

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    I would have thought they would have taken very little with them. I assume they would be 3rd class passengers and there wouldn't be much room for them. Would they have slept separately? males together and females together. Would it have taken about three months to get there. Not sure if there are any books on the subject sorry.
     
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  3. Half Hour

    Half Hour Well-Known Member

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    Somewhere I have read what settlers were allowed to take to Canada but of course I can't find it now... keep googling! Here is something about going to the U.S. a much shorter trip than to Australia!
    Code:
    http://www.understandingyourancestors.com/ia/shipVoyage.aspx
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
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  4. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

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    I think it all depended on their financial circumstances. Some came as bounty passengers travelling steerage, some paid their way also travelling steerage some in better class accommodation and in the case of a group of Scottish setters, as an example, they hired the Coromandel and sailed all the way up the Hawkesbury River settling near Ebenezer. I believe this group, not the norm, brought most of their possessions. So I guess mostly they only brought what they were allowed which I guess wasn't much.
    We have examples of bush furniture made by the settlers in museums. They were quite good at making do with a kerosene tin and a log.
     
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  5. Peregrine

    Peregrine Well-Known Member

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    A hall table, with nicely turned legs, made by my great grandfather, Sam Perkins, is now in possession of my daughter after spending many years as my parent's hall table.
    My father grew up in the house that Sam built around 1900, which did not have a bathroom until one was made under the eastern verandah. As a youngster, my father was apparently bathed in a kerosene tin out in the back yard!
     
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  6. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Quite possible that in early years, when traders began 'trading' they bought goods to Australia from all over. Maybe the family had things sent on when they were more financially able.
     
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