Why/how did they do it?

Discussion in 'Migration & Shipping' started by Brentor boy, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. Brentor boy

    Brentor boy Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    In an age when we can travel half way around the world in a matter of hours and immediately inform people of our safe arrival, it is perhaps easy up overlook the detetmination and fortitude displayed by our pioneering ancestors, often of low status, as they migrated around the country and across the globe 150-200 years go.

    What were the push/pull factors that motivated them? How, and how much, did they know of their intended destination? How did they arrange and fund their travel? At a time of low levels of illiteracy and no universal mailing system, how did a dispersed family maintain contact, if at all? Were they daring or desparate?

    I realise there are a multitude of aswers but this is what puts the flesh on the bones of family history. Unfortunately here is so rarely any written evidence.
     
    Eve, Half Hour, Ma-dotcom and 3 others like this.
  2. Archie's Mum

    Archie's Mum Always digging up clues

    Offline
    Messages:
    6,239
    Likes Received:
    22,457
    Location:
    Orange, NSW Australia. The Colour City.
    • Bounty immigrants were chosen by Australian colonists to come from the British Isles to Australia.
    • Assisted immigrants came to Australia through the financial assistance of the government, organizations, or wealthy individuals.
    • Paying passengers came to Australia through their own means.
    We all know the story of the convicts but these are other ways in which Australia was colonised in the early years.
    A better life would have been the main motivator. Usually it worked well for them.
     
    Ma-dotcom, Brentor boy and Sis like this.
  3. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

    Online
    Messages:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    8,780
    Location:
    Middlesex
    Some of my Yorkshire 'cloth workers' went to the US. In my case ,in the 19th century woollen mills were set up in Fishkill NY and workers were needed, so jobs were advertised here, with assistance with passage and housing, and so off they went. Whether they kept in contact with family left behind I have no idea,
    I suppose it all depended on their ability to read and write.
     
    Ma-dotcom, Sis and Brentor boy like this.
  4. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

    Offline
    Messages:
    2,427
    Likes Received:
    10,537
    Location:
    North Devon, England
    Cornish miners (and miners from other parts of the UK) emigrated to all corners of the globe in pursuit of a new life. There's a good summing up of the migration at
    Code:
    http://www.cornish-mining.org.uk/sites/default/files/10%20-%20Mining%20migration.pdf
    I like the verse at the beginning of the article -
    Some say of the Cornish miner
    His home is the wide, wide world
    For his pick is always ringing
    Where the Union Jack's unfurled
    (Herbert Thomas 1896)
     
    LianeH, Brentor boy, MollyMay and 3 others like this.
  5. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

    Offline
    Messages:
    5,674
    Likes Received:
    14,268
    Location:
    South Australia
    I wish I could say same of my Gt.G'FAther a tin miner & herbalist c 1822 'England'. He is buried in the same grave as another man of same name who some have claimed as his father. For me, I need more proof than that of relationship. No idea when he or any parent arrived in Australia. Well, 'James Smith'? no surprises there.
    Papers said of him that he was a long time resident.
     
    Half Hour likes this.
  6. GrannyBarb

    GrannyBarb Custodian of the Family Accounts

    Offline
    Messages:
    1,062
    Likes Received:
    4,693
    Location:
    Lower Alabama, USA
    My tree has lots of early colonists to America. Some came for religious or political reasons, but most came here to have their own piece of land. Likewise with my southern kin who continually moved to newly available areas (often displacing natives). :oops: I have a few who arrived in Canada as the result of military pensions that became gentleman farmers! Among all these we have a few surviving letters and documents about those early days and hard times. We are a lot of softies compared to those folks!
     
    Ma-dotcom, Half Hour and Sis like this.
  7. Sis

    Sis Rootles out resources!

    Offline
    Messages:
    3,188
    Likes Received:
    12,507
    Location:
    Beckenham, Western Australia
    How frustrating Wendy! So glad I don't have any Smiths in my family, not that I know yet anyway.
     
  8. Half Hour

    Half Hour Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    924
    Likes Received:
    5,983
    Location:
    Owen Sound, Ontario
    Through trying to solve the deeper ancestors on my paternal, paternal side I have found that there seemed to be a lot of folks distantly related who all came here over the course of the 1800's. I'm sure in letters back home by those who could write and of course newspaper reports of people who had emigrated others got the "bug" to go as well. I know I have seen old Irish papers online where they talk about former residents who are now in Canada. ( Just not my family :mad: ) One English grandmother came as an assisted housekeeper so her reason was financial and a new life. My other English grandmother came to work and live her as her sister and brother-in-law were already settled. I really think it was the promise of a better life that was the big draw.
     
  9. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

    Offline
    Messages:
    5,674
    Likes Received:
    14,268
    Location:
    South Australia
    I appear to have 9 separate lines of people marrying into my families.:rolleyes: No 10 is my main line.
     
    Half Hour and Sis like this.
  10. Sis

    Sis Rootles out resources!

    Offline
    Messages:
    3,188
    Likes Received:
    12,507
    Location:
    Beckenham, Western Australia
    :eek:o_O
     
    Ma-dotcom likes this.
  11. Sis

    Sis Rootles out resources!

    Offline
    Messages:
    3,188
    Likes Received:
    12,507
    Location:
    Beckenham, Western Australia
    So, what do I know!!:oops::rolleyes: I do have Smiths and in OH's tree too. But they are all distantly related, so I wont get around to them for some time.;)
     
    Ma-dotcom likes this.
  12. Brentor boy

    Brentor boy Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    My great grandfather was one of four sons of a Cornish miner who themselves were also miners. They lied buried in Northumberland, India, America and New Zealand.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice