William Collier Blanket maker

Discussion in 'Oxfordshire' started by peter cameron, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    I thought that Matthew lived at Hardwick Ducklington.
     
  2. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    It seems that Anne father Matthew (junior) died in 1682.
     
  3. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    Two things that I hadn't noticed:
    1) William Rogers of Ducklington was one of the trustees of Dr. Samuel Cripps' charity.
    2) In his diary for Sept. 22nd 1717, Thomas Hearne wrote: This morning I walk'd over to Apleton in Berks., a mile beyond Cumner. I was at Church there. Dr. Samuel Cripps, Rector of the Place, preach'd. He is a very indifferent Preacher. He was Fellow of Magdalen College, to which College the Parsonage belongs. The Parsonage is worth about two hundred £’s. per an. The Dr. was first Curate of this Place. There is a pretty good Congregation comes to the church now. Yet there are several Sectaries in the Parish.

    Hearne also records the death of Dr. Cripps on Feb. 7th 1730. , this time reserving his typically caustic comment for the widow: 'He was a good, honest, quiet man, and made an excellent Parish Priest, being well-beloved there, and the better because he used to invite his Parishioners in their turns to dine with him on Sundays. He was a good Country Preacher. His first wife was a very good woman and is often spoke of there to this day with respect. But his second wife, now a widow, is a miserable, stingy, ill-natured, wretch, not at all like the other.
    ....
     
  4. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    Can't agree about Anne [Collier's] father. He died in 1719: his will was written in 1716.
     
  5. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Oh Peter I can't compete with you on your information, and I have got the Matthew Cripps’ wrong too.
     
  6. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    I thought I had this somewhere.
    In 1697 a trusted servant called John Pryor was found murdered in the grounds of Burford Priory. The Priory's owner (the earl of Abercorn) was tried at Oxford Assizes but acquitted
     
  7. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    Yes, I had seen that. I am sure that was the uncle of Jane Rogers and the brother of Matthew Prior. I have seen his will which was proved in 1697 and is interesting. I have not yet looked at the will of the younger John Prior proved in 1719.
    It occurs to me that the Kearey Collier in Jane Rogers' will might be Kerrie as in the name of her sister in law and I might indeed have misread the reference and it refers to a Kerrie nephew. I must check.
     
  8. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    I am a complete idiot! I misread the sentence in Jane Rogers' will. It reads 'I give unto my nephews William Walter John Kearey and Robert Collier'... I assumed, because there are no commas, that these were all Christian names of Colliers. Actually she meant 'William Walter', 'John Kearey' [i.e. Kerrie], 'Robert Collier.' Apologies for giving you false info. Derek.
     
  9. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Peter, I expect you have seen this, but for those who haven’t this was 17th century justice. A right stitch up!

    From the History of Burford
    By
    William J. Monk
    1932

    Protestant Mercury
    2nd to the 7th April 1697

    “We have advice from Burford, in Oxfordshire, that one, Mr P., a very peaceable gentleman of that town, was on Saturday last sent for by his next neighbour, Mr. H., and were afterwards seen to walk in Mr. H,’s garden, and sometime afterwards Mr. H. came in and called for his boots, but ‘twas observed he did not put them on, only rode out a little way to blind (as be supposed) all suspicion, for soon after Mr. P. was found murdered in the said garden where they were both seen walking together, having several barbarous wounds in his body, which the prisoner’s sword was found exactly to fit, and was very bloody, so that upon good grounds he was committed to Oxford gaol.”

    Post Boy
    July 20th to 22nd 1697

    Oxford July 19th. The first day of the Assizes here, The Right Hon. Lord Wharton, Lord Lieutenant of the County (in the room of the Earl of Abingdon, who is removed) came to this city, and was met by the High Sheriff and most of the gentlemen of the county, and we hear his Lordship has settled his militia of officers to satisfaction. The next day the Earl of Abingdon came to town, and was met by almost all the officers of the colleges and abundance of townsmen to the number of 400 or 500. The trial of my Lord Abercorn drew down hither his Grace the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Arran. The same lasted seven hours; it being for murder of one Mr. Prior at Burford. His Lordship was Acquitted. Sir John Walter was foreman of the Jury”.
     
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  10. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    No - I hadn't seen that. Fascinating and must have caused some bitterness at the obvious injustice. Worth further investigation.
    I did come across the marriage at Ducklington of Sarah Prior to William Walter - 1709 from my memory - and find they had two children Sarah and William. That would explain finally, after my mis-reading of Jane Rogers' will, the nephew William Walter. William Walter was an upholsterer or upholder in Southwark and his will was proved in October 1734 (nat. archives). He owned a number of properties in the area and was evidently prosperous. He does not mention any of the Witney/Ducklington connections. A number of leases relating to his properties are listed as at the Museum of Rural Life on the a2a website.
     
  11. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Hi Peter.
    Not quite the £107 million pound lottery prize, but a lot at the time for John Pryor.

    GETTING A PRIZE. (From the history of Burford)

    Mr. Lenthall, a descendant of the Speaker, had in his service a butler, who surprised him one morning by stating that he had had the good fortune to win £3,000 in a lottery. He then further stated that he had long wished to live up to the style of a gentleman possessing about £3,000 per annum, and he wished to know if Mr. Lenthall would take him back into his service should his money be exhausted in the twelve months. “That is a promise I may safely make, John,” said Mr. Lenthall, who did not imagine, of course, that any man who had lived up to the style of ,£3,000 a year would ever wish to be employed again as a servant. However, he was mistaken, for at the end of the year John had spent all the money, except a little which he had employed in purchasing an annuity, and according to promise was taken into Mr. Lenthall’s service again, in which he continued many years.
     
  12. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Hello Peter.

    I don’t know if you had seen this, but it’s about Matthew Pryor of Ducklington. Its taken from “History of Witney” by J.A. Giles, published in 1852. A slab in the Nave floor of Ducklington Church.

    “In memory of Mr. Matthew Pryor,
    Who died July the 23 1718
    Aged 78".

    Our friend now sleeps in silent shades, but when
    The Aetherial trumpet sounds, shall wake again,
    Refreshed, renewed, in better state than ever,
    Which comfort once obtained, will fail him never,
    From us he’s gone, but liveth yet in names;
    His character, though short, we thus proclaim:
    A man sedate, in temper free from strife,
    Deservedly respected all his life,
    A husband kind, a father very dear,
    As from his offspring you may always hear,
    True to his friend, to poor and neighbours kind:
    Such were the brave endowments of his mind.
     
  13. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    No, many thanks Derek - I didn't have that!
    I began my interest in the Collier family with a query about two [as it turned out] Robert Colliers who were silversmiths in London in the 1720's and 30's. Trying to resolve that question led me to a much wider enquiry. I have now, however, written up my results - although still imperfect - into a short essay with a few illustrations and I have added some family trees at the end [
     
  14. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    [the layout of the trees is a bit clumsy]. My intention is to find the best way of adding that essay to this website in case of interest to others. As soon as I can work out how to do that, I will do so.
     
  15. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Hi Peter
    I love the essay. I have learnt so much more about my family. Thank you so much. One thing though. Do you know who was the John Phipps Solicitor of Weavers Hall in the early 1800's was.
     
  16. peter cameron

    peter cameron Member

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    Thanks, Derek, I am glad you liked the essay. I have yet to work out a way of simply adding the pdf to this forum for others to comment on. I think that the answer regarding John Phipps, solicitor of Weavers' Hall, is that I was unable to determine that he was for sure a relation of the Phipps family that I was working on - so in the end I passed on that question because it is slightly later in any case than the period on which I was focused.
    I am, at present, about to amend the essay on the Colliers and Phipps connections because I am investigating a peculiar coincidence. It would seem that Elizabeth Collier, the widow of Robert Collier and later second wife of James Phipps, had a trading connection with Joseph Collier, the Quaker goldsmith and Town Steward of Plymouth. Joseph Collier is known from his accounts as Steward to have supplied several Freedom Boxes presented by the Mayor and Corporation of Plymouth. One of these is now in the Plymouth museum and can be seen online. At least two of the Freedom boxes are struck with a maker's mark which would seem to be that of Elizabeth Collier in London. I cannot, however, see any actual family relationship between Joseph Collier of Plymouth and the Colliers of London and Witney. Joseph Collier was born about 1690 and his father, Thomas Collier, lived in Gryndle/Grindle in Devon. All a puzzle!
     
  17. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    OK Peter I understand. I have just had a look at Newspapers Archives Online and see that in 1810 John Phipps was working in Gutter Lane Cheapside, and that he was secretary to the Association of Weavers.
    I too have never found a connection with the Collier's of Plymouth. I think Lord Monkswell was or is a Collier of Plymouth.
     
  18. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Hello Peter
    Not sure if you can help me with a little question. Do you know who the William of London was whose two sons James Phipps Collier, and Samuel Phipps Collier were buried at Witney 10th Jan 1774. William's wife's name is down as Ann and she was buried at Witney 30th August 1794. I just can't seem to place him in a Collier family in Witney, so he must be a London born Collier, but with very close connections with Witney.
     
  19. D Collier

    D Collier Member

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    Sorry Peter I have another for you. Any idea what happened to this Stephen?

    STEPHEN COLLIER: Son of Edward and Ann Guy of Witney.
    Apprenticeship: May 3, 1780, to Thomas Hill, Goldsmith and watchcase maker of Aldergate St. London.
     
  20. M Powers

    M Powers New Member

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    American Descendant of Collier Family
    I've been reading this with fascination. My Isaac Collier came to Virginia in 1650. He left behind a brother, John Collier, in London, listed as a cloth-merchant. Isaac and John were the sons of Robert Collyer of London (buried Brockenhurst 1641) who was in turn the son of Robert Collyer, pewterer of London, and his wife Mary Strange. Our Robert the Pewterer was descended from the Colliers of Darlaston who were drapers from way back. Reading about the other Colliers of the same time who had similar occupations is interesting. The Colliers in Virginia were shop owners and owned large tracts of land. When brother John died in London in 1649, he listed his brother Isaack Collyer and the 500 pounds Isaack owed him (which was forgiven). Our Isaac died in 1788 in York County, Virginia. Isaac had a son Charles who had a son Vines who served in the 7 Years War and then the Revolutionary War. The family moved on to Georgia where their descendants live today. Are any of the posters here familiar with our Robert the Pewterer?
     
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