WW1 uniform ?

Discussion in 'British Army' started by Philb-c, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    If it was going to be easy Ann, it wouldn't be so much fun :)
     
  2. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

    Offline
    Messages:
    2,396
    Likes Received:
    10,397
    Location:
    North Devon, England
    You can say that again Phil - and I can't find anything in the papers to help :sceptical:
     
  3. WelchRegLost

    WelchRegLost Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    455
    Location:
    Wolverhampton
    Badge for the Queens upload_2018-2-14_14-41-58.png

    Doesn't look like the cap badge in the photo to me
     
  4. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    It all looks too much like coincidence to me ....

    We have an autograph book (not being seriously used) found in "the box" with a cartoon style war drawing signed "Walter Clack 1915".

    On another page: "Though seas may divide and distants [sic] divide, whatever time may send, it cannot alter faithful hearts, or sever friend from friend"
    Then (written upside down) "When in this book you look, and on this page you frown, think of the one who spoilt your book, by writing upside down. Walter Clack, Jan 10 1915"

    Then we have a piece of paper with (what looks like) troop movements/military intelligence for (what looks like) 1st July 1916, written by I.W.J.CLACK on the day he died (age: 22) also found in "the box" !

    Finally an empty envelope from "The War Office, graves registration and enquiries", dated September 1916 addressed to "Miss Winifred DAVIS" in Worthing, Sussex (she would have been age: 28).

    My theory is that Miss Winifred DAVIS and Walter CLACK were either friends, very close friends or possibly even engaged (and I think that on Valentine's Day, they would like us to find the link to prove it) :)

    See .... I am an old romantic :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
    Sis and Bay Horse like this.
  5. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    Sorry, my fault .... Two totally different subjects. I.W.J.CLACK was in "The Queens" - not our gentleman in #1
    Perhaps I should have done two separate posts .... We can forget about #1 for the moment :)
     
  6. WelchRegLost

    WelchRegLost Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    455
    Location:
    Wolverhampton
    Ah ok.
     
  7. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman

    Offline
    Messages:
    1,624
    Likes Received:
    2,776
    Location:
    Nottingham U.K.
    His medal roll is on Ancestry*. It appears he went to France on 31 August 1915.
    * 1915 Star plus British and Victory medals.
     
    Sis, Ma-dotcom, Philb-c and 1 other person like this.
  8. WelchRegLost

    WelchRegLost Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    455
    Location:
    Wolverhampton
    From the Queens Royal Surreys website for 1915

    Code:
     http://www.queensroyalsurreys.org.uk/time_line/eastsurrey/1915.shtml
    7th Battalion

    Moves to France.

    June In trenches near Armentières.

    September Battle of Loos.

    In trenches near La Bassée.
     
  9. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman

    Offline
    Messages:
    1,624
    Likes Received:
    2,776
    Location:
    Nottingham U.K.
    A transcription of the War Diary can be found here.http://qrrarchive.websds.net/PDF/QWD0071916007.pdf

    They lost 7 officers and 174 other ranks on that day.
     
  10. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    Without being in the least bit disrespectful, 7 + 174 would have been incredibly low numbers for those times .... but 1 is one too many :(
     
  11. Flook

    Flook A True Gentleman

    Offline
    Messages:
    1,624
    Likes Received:
    2,776
    Location:
    Nottingham U.K.
    Oh come on! Even if it was full strength (which it probably wasn't) it would have only been 900-1000 men strong. To have 181 killed, 284 wounded and 56 missing on one day appears pretty awful to me.
     
  12. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    Hang on Flook, please don't have a pop at me, it's your numbers and I just replied to say that just "one is one too many" and (going on what I have read) there were days when 181 would have been considered an incredibly low number for one day (what "the powers that be" at the time would consider to be "acceptable losses") .... I'm not demeaning in any way the sacrifices of WW1.
    Just one life is one too many to me !!!
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
  13. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    UPDATE

    See: post #5, Private 3137 IWJ CLACK.

    I have now heard back from the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment who directed me to CWGC and (after a little toing and froing) they advise me that the trench map reference provided "62c.A.8.b.3.2" on the paper (#5 actually states "62c.A.8.a") equates to the location of the original 1916 resting place of private 3137 I.W.J. CLACK.
    In 1921 he was exhumed and subsequently reburied at Dantzig Alley British Cemetery. The CWGC also kindly forwarded several more documents in respect of this.

    They have also stated that "Miss Davis must have been Pte Clack's nominated next-of-kin in order to receive that sort of letter" (#5). This possibly supports my theory in "#24" as the paper was quite possibly in the
    envelope addressed to her from Graves Registration dated September 1916. Miss DAVIS subsequently married another in 1918 and the CWGC show his mother as being his next-of-kin in 1921.

    I now have a plethora of documents relating to 3137 Isaac Walter John CLACK (usually, but not always, shown just as Walter) with the exception of the one document showing his next-of-kin (possibly Miss DAVIS) at the time of enlistment on 26 October 1914 to prove (or disprove) the theory.
     
    Bay Horse, Doug, Chimp and 6 others like this.
  14. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

    Offline
    Messages:
    3,460
    Likes Received:
    8,616
    Location:
    Middlesex
    Well done Phil:), perhaps one day someone will be looking for Isaac Walter John Clack and will find this post;)
     
    Bay Horse and Sis like this.
  15. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    I feel now that my quest is to discover a definite link (aside from the autograph book and a random piece of paper in a box of photographs) between Private Isaac Walter John CLACK and Miss Emily Winifred DAVIS as opposed to
    "one day" .... which implies that perhaps I won't be around any longer to know about it !
     
  16. Philb-c

    Philb-c Well-Known Member

    Offline
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1,523
    Location:
    Wimborne, Dorset, England
    Regarding the link between IWJ CLACK and Miss DAVIS in Worthing .... The Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment was billeted in Shoreham and Worthing in 1914 and before departing for France in 1915.
    A good chance that's how they met :)
     
    Findem, Bay Horse, MollyMay and 3 others like this.
  17. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

    Offline
    Messages:
    1,415
    Likes Received:
    8,772
    Location:
    North-west England
    I think you're probably right.

    Good work. :)
     
    MollyMay likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice