Telephone what!?

Discussion in 'Ask The Experts' started by mugwortismy cat, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    How are we meant to know:(? it's like a cryptic password to your secret club and I'll never get in ...
     
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  2. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I think it might say 'Tele-Graph' but I've not seen it written that way before. I was more bothered about the underneath bit anyway, and that's sorted 8(:-) .
     
  3. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    ;) I know the area rather well, Mealymoo.

    :D
     
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  4. Mutters

    Mutters I am not bossy, I just have better ideas.

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    Following the above suggestion, I agree with others,
    telephone wireman - worker
    and overwritten is the word telegraph
     
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  5. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Telephone winderup worker.?
     
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  6. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    Oooh, most of my Cotton's come from there, so is it 'Slaw-it' or 'Slar-wit'? Please put me right.
    I will hold my hands up and admit to being one of those who are wrong:) in saying Slaythwaite, well I do come from London;), as did Mum who would be amazed to find out where her roots really lay, she thought she was London through and through.
     
  7. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I live in Plaistow in London, when they first introduced the recorded announcements on the undergrapound trains, they used to say (in some posh lady voice) "the next station is Play-stow", I was amused to see the locals grittng their teeth and grabbing the armrests, in vain attempts not to shout at the announcer and/or leave the train. After a while it began to bug me too (I guess I've become a Londoner to some extent after all).

    Then they changed it, with a less posh voice (for all us poor downtrodden overly class conscious East Enders not to feel sneered at) to 'Plaa-stow'. Thankfully.

    By the way, I have recently discovered distant cousins who lived just round the corner from me here ...
     
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  8. Mealymoo

    Mealymoo A Busy Lizzy

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    Hi Molly May, it's Slaw-it or Slow-it to the locals, to the rest of us from Huddersfield it's Slathwait.

    I love listening to a collection of regional voice recordings produced by University of Leeds, you may be interested in this one from 1928, the chap speaking is from Golcar which is in the Colne Valley and very near to Slaithwaite, he mentions Slawit so you can hear for yourself how the locals pronounce it, by the way if you can understand all he's saying you're a better woman than me, and I'm from the town :) ;)

    http://
    sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dialects/Survey-of-English-dialects/021M-C0908X0010XX-0100V1
     
  9. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    Thanks Mealymoo - loved it, especially the wife (?) in background! I got the gist, no more - mine worked in the woollen industry (like everyone else it seems), and cricket and bowls, the interviewer had to work hard to get the answers:)

    I must try and retrain my brain to the correct pronunciation!
     
  10. Malcolm Webb

    Malcolm Webb Well-Known Member

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    I used to play in a brass band when I was much younger and we often came up against "Slar-Wit" on the competition circuit. They were invariably referred to as "Slaith-Waite" up and down the country but the pronunciation was equally invariably corrected in that blunt way that only a Yorkshireman can get away with. I'm Yorkshire born and bred but Lincolnshire by adoption.

    All the best,
    Malcolm Webb
    Lincoln UK
     
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  11. Mealymoo

    Mealymoo A Busy Lizzy

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    Have you ever visited the area MollyMay? I no longer live in the Huddersfield district, haven't lived there for over 40yrs - moved to the big city (Leeds), my maternal ancestors were from the Colne Valley and I know it well, I was brought up in the Holme Valley. I still miss the dramatic scenery, beautiful reservoirs, lovely canal side walks and stone built cottages, not forgetting the eccentric locals and unthemed traditional Pubs. I visit the area a few times each year for my 'fix'. Thinking of going tomorrow or Thursday, there's a lovely car run from Greenfield towards Holmfirth through moorland and passing a few reservoirs along the way. Feeling excited by the prospect now, and know a great hostelry which serves home cooked roast ham. :)
     
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  12. Yeates

    Yeates Active Member

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    Category: more-than-you-wanted-to-know:
    Re: spelling & pronunciation of “Arkansas” & Glenn Campbell
    ---as are many names in the States, this is derived from the French fur-traders/explorers bumbling of a native American word meaning, evidently, ‘downstream place.’ So it is both French and Native American. One site (don’t know if it is true, but based on other archaic legislation, I can believe it) tells of a 19th century law in Arkansas that, at a point early in that territory’s (or early Statehood), it was illegal to mispronounce the name.
    http://
    www.
    statesymbolsusa.org/Arkansas/name_origin.html
    and
    http://
    littlerock.about.com/library/weekly/aa051500b.htm

    also….
    Glen Campbell made good on his southern accent---helps to sell country music, I guess. In the Midwest, it is more accurately ‘Wichita’---not sure how the Eastern seaboard handles such. I don’t know much about country music, but heard Campbell (helped by his wife) give a radio interview some months ago on his last---and may I say, very brave---tour as he was rapidly succumbing to Alzheimers.---Yeates
     
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  13. Bay Horse

    Bay Horse Can be a bit of a dark horse

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    Ooh, where's that? Slowly ticking off the hostelries in the area. :)

    I've been humming "Witchita Lineman" ever since Ken's post. :oops: Have much respect for Glen Campbell since I heard of his illness (I cared for my mother-in-law with the disease).

    Mugs, your Muncasters - are they related to the Castle at all?
     
  14. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I wish ;); only in the sense that it is believed that all people named Muncaster originate from that area of Cumberland. Since the place was called Mulcaster originally you will also find Mulcaster families, who obviously moved away earlier (heh, or are even descended from the original owners of the castle? but I think they were/are Penningtons).

    I can only locate my Muncasters in the North East, but haven't managed to get back that far ...
     
  15. MollyMay

    MollyMay Knows where to find the answers!

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    Sadly no - it is on my list of place to see one day. We did visit the N Yorkshire Moors a couple of years back - absolutely beautiful. One day I will get to York too. I am off to Scotland next week - never been there before either!
     
  16. Mealymoo

    Mealymoo A Busy Lizzy

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    I'll send you details via conversation message (PM).
     
  17. Mealymoo

    Mealymoo A Busy Lizzy

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    The Colne and Holme valleys are beautiful but a much smaller area than the North York Moors. Holmfirth, where I was brought up, was the location for Last of the Summer Wine, and Where the Heart Is was filmed in the Colne Valley (Marsden and Slaithwaite).

    Enjoy Scotland, it will be great if this glorious weather lasts.
     
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