Frampton, Dorset - Parish registers

Discussion in 'Ask The Experts' started by mugwortismy cat, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    What you need is an indisputable "G". There must be one somewhere, but the writing doesn't seem totally consistent anyway...
     
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  2. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    the next page has this :

    upload_2014-12-4_16-50-40.png

    and this (admittedly a poor example) for another 'Sandiner'

    upload_2014-12-4_16-52-39.png
     
  3. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    Having seen that, I'm going to withdraw my suggestion of Gardiner. I was wondering about Sandiner (it appears as a surname in some transcripts online), but I'm a bit more inclined towards Sandiver - the 3rd from last letter in this latest example does look more like a "u" (often used for "v") than "n".

    Sandiver is also recorded as a surname, for example in an 1814 edition of the Gentleman's Magazine of which the original can be seen in Google books. Not apparently from Dorset, but if you search around you may find a more relevant occurrence.
     
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  4. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Thank you Mr K :)

    You've come up trumps! the suggestion of Sandiver makes it much more likely that my tentative theory that this family belongs with the early Sandiford family is right {sorry that sentence seems very strangely constructed ... I hope it makes sense!}

    double-checked, and although FS does have Sandiner for some of the transcriptions, Sandiver is also given --- I think I am going to change all my Sandiners to Sandivers :D
     
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  5. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome!

    If I ever knew about the Sandifords, I'd forgotten about them, so there was no kind of attempt on my part to come up with a name that seemed similar. But given the typical fluidity of names at that period, I'd think it very likely that they are one and the same.
     
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  6. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Hadn't had need to mention them on this thread yet ... and my theory about linking the two names into one family was filed away for future reference so I hadn't brought it into the public arena, until you, all by yourself, came up with your brilliant suggestion :cool:
     
  7. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    OK, jumping into 1696

    Again, please, an interpretation of surnames for the two Samuels :)

    upload_2014-12-4_20-29-53.png
     
  8. arthurk

    arthurk Well-Known Member

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    Me again :)

    Be... for the first one (Bell???), and I'm pretty sure the second one is Bishop again. I think that's going to be my lot for tonight - better let someone else have a turn!
     
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  9. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Thanks for Bishop :) (took me a while to get there :rolleyes:)

    I had put Bell initially, but there isn't a Bell family in Frampton -- I do have a BESS(E) family though ... given that it is squeezed into a small space could it be Bess?

    Oh, and don't feel that you have to run away!
     
  10. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Pritheye? 1st letter is a bit different to Brown on next line.
    Betts is a known name also.
    I too must away. Enjoy.
     
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  11. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    I can see where Pritheye comes from, and that is almost what Ancestry have -- they've gone for Bitheye

    BUT, (1) not always are the B's completely closed at the bottom, and (2) given that Mr BROWNE Esq is the Lord of the Manor, they have given him more space and written him in more carefully ... also (3) I do have evidence of a BISHOP family, whereas Pritheye ...

    I do have Betts in my tree (though they are from Norfolk), think I will stick with Bess, unless someone wants to convince me ...
     
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  12. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    Now you see why I avoid those early Baptisms, imagine checking & correcting something I'm not experienced or comfortable with. Am happier in 1700s & onwards.
     
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  13. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Ahhhh Wendy, I appreciate the fact that you tried {-(^^)-}

    When I first started transcribing records for Frampton (what, a year ago?) I started with the 1813 onwards PRs, I did peek at the early ones and quickly decided NO WAY!!
    But then, with the help of people here I found I was able to start reading PCC wills :) after that the early PRs seemed a doddle ...

    Problems arise of course, but (perhaps) at no more regular intervals than they did in the C19 PRs, or the C20 ones come to that :eek:

    Or some of the census entries I've looked at .... some people's writing is atrocious :D

    Learning a different writing system ... daunting ... but not impossible. And helped immensely by the formulaic nature of the records --- don't think I'd want to tackle someone's diary or private letters o_O

    Perhaps you just need some more practice ;) .... don't worry I won't make you ...
     
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  14. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    I've come a bit late to this party, but I agree with Bess and Bishop :) I can't quite make out if the Bess has an 'e' at the end - there could be one there which has sort of dropped off and landed in with the 'th' below.

    Ann
     
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  15. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Thanks Ann:)

    I have actually put Besse in the transcription, but agree that it is ambiguous so I think I will put the final 'e' in brackets

    I think that is all the questions for the moment, but will remind everyone that the Youenith/Yonevith etc etc query is still outstanding ;)

    What I am going to do now is compare my baptisms transcription systematically with A and FS and make note of differences, might take too long and I might get bored but I think it should be useful (I've only done it so far where I had queries)

    Once that is done it's double-check on the burials and marriages ... at which point I'll get back to you ...
     
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  16. Daft Bat

    Daft Bat Administrator. Chief cook & bottle washer! Staff Member

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    Could it be Younice - like Eunice is today?
     
  17. mugwortismy cat

    mugwortismy cat Tenacious to the End!

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    Oh Jan, I knew you were a genius :D

    I had this niggling feeling that I really knew what this name was, I kept waiting for it to come to me -- Youenith = Eunice. The problem was I was pronouncing it in my head with three syllables, when it should be two. And now I know how I should spell it too :)

    My life is now complete :cool: (for the moment anyway)
     
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  18. Ma-dotcom

    Ma-dotcom A Bonza Little Digger!

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    I also tried Kent somethingorothers way back for Ancestry, no go, too new to it all. So settled for Canadian Army payrolls or such & then Gazettes.
    Now I'm still waiting on a disc which evidently someone else thought they needed more than me, so now waiting for a repost. Hence my meanderings here & there lately.
    Bedside dogs have deserted for their own beds, & nights have been somewhat stewed, so when dogs come in a 6.30am because I've slept in, am not altogether welcoming.

    Youenith - why couldn't people have had lisps back then also??
     
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  19. AnnB

    AnnB Editor in Chief who is Hot off the Press!

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    That is a brilliant deduction Jan :cool: I was trying to make Edith out of it, but it was far too long for that. My idea of Gwenith never sat right, so we can all rest easy now. Thank you :)

    Ann
     

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